2 Peter 3:14 Therefore, beloved, looking forward to these things, be diligent to be found by Him in peace, without spot and blameless;

Category: Imperative of the Week Posted: 11-18-2017 By: Gerrit Kamp

Peter writes this in his second epistle, which he wrote to wake up his sleepy audience’s pure minds (3:1). In this epistle, he used quite a bit of ink talking about the world’s upcoming destruction. He writes:

2 Peter 3:10 But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up. 11 Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, what manner of persons ought you to be in holy conduct and godliness, 12 looking for and hastening (or earnestly desiring, ASV) the coming of the day of God, because of which the heavens will be dissolved, being on fire, and the elements will melt with fervent heat? 13 Nevertheless we, according to His promise, look for new heavens and a new earth in which righteousness dwells.

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Luke 8:18 Therefore take heed how you hear. For whoever has, to him more will be given; and whoever does not have, even what he seems to have will be taken from him.

Category: Imperative of the Week Posted: 11-10-2017 By: Gerrit Kamp

We find this imperative in a tiny paragraph in the eighth chapter of the gospel of Luke. The command is that Jesus’ audience (the disciples) had to take heed how they were hearing. The greek for take heed is ‘blepo’ and it means to see, to be observant. This can be in a literal sense, with your eyes, or in a metaphorical sense, with your mind. In our verse today, it clearly is the latter option. Be careful, take heed, pay attention are all valid translations.

So what should the disciples be careful about? About how they hear. The greek for how you hear is ‘pos akouo’, which means indeed by what means or in what manner you hear. Then Jesus gives them the reason why they should be careful about how they hear. For whoever has, to him more will be given; and whoever does not have, even what he seems to have will be taken from him.

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1Timothy 5:7 And these things command, that they may be blameless.

Category: Imperative of the Week Posted: 11-03-2017 By: Gerrit Kamp

This tiny little verse, found in the first letter of Paul to Timothy, consists of only 6 words in the original Greek. Its direct meaning will therefore probably be quite straightforward. So what are these Greek words? 

The verse starts with ‘kai’, which is a coordinating conjunction and usually translated as ‘and’. It will often join two similar words, or it will also frequently introduce something that is a result of what was written before. That is probably the case in our verse today.

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1 Corinthians 15:58 Therefore, my beloved brethren, be steadfast, immovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that your labor is not in vain in the Lord.

Category: Imperative of the Week Posted: 10-13-2017 By: Gerrit Kamp

We find this verse in the first letter from Paul to the church in Corinth. It appears near the end of the letter, it’s the last verse of the penultimate chapter. Is has the following structure: In the light of what I just said (a), do certain things (b), because you know something (c). So in order to understand the verse, we should know the things Paul wrote earlier (a), the things he tells the Corinthians (and by extension, us) to do (b), and the thing that they (we) should know (c). So let’s look at each of these three elements.

First, what are the things about which Paul wrote earlier? This could be the previous sentence, or paragraph, or chapter, or the whole letter. Throughout the letter, we see Paul explaining difficult concepts, and then he gives instructions that follow from these concepts. The last instructions (before our verse) are in chapter 15:33-34. What then follows is the explanation (in verses 35-57) about the glorious bodies we will get after our resurrection. Paul explains how these resurrected bodies will be glorious, powerful, incorruptible, and spiritual. He also explains that there will be different degrees of glory, just like the stars have different degrees of brightness. Jesus is like the sun; He will have the most glory. People like Paul, Moses, and Daniel will be like very bright stars (see also Daniel 12:2-3). People who serve God less will have lower degrees of glory. Our future glory will depend on our works.

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John 14:11 Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father in Me, or else believe Me for the sake of the works themselves.

Category: Imperative of the Week Posted: 09-29-2017 By: Gerrit Kamp

We find this verse in the 14th chapter of the book of John. Jesus said this in response to a question he received from one of his disciples, Philip:

John 14:8 Philip said to Him, “Lord, show us the Father, and it is sufficient for us.” 9 Jesus said to him, “Have I been with you so long, and yet you have not known Me, Philip? He who has seen Me has seen the Father; so how can you say, ‘Show us the Father’? 10 Do you not believe that I am in the Father, and the Father in Me? The words that I speak to you I do not speak on My own authority; but the Father who dwells in Me does the works. 11 Believe Me that I am in the Father and the Father in Me, or else believe Me for the sake of the works themselves.

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